Martian Meteorites from Mojave Crater

There are about 150 known Martian meteorites, and now researchers have a good idea about where many of them came from on the Red Planet. Previous studies of shergottite meteorites suggested that they might be quite young, in some cases crystallizing less than 600 million years ago. But, Werner and colleagues believe that all shergottites originate from Mars’ Mojave Crater, about 34 miles (55 kilometers) wide and placed in the crust about 4.3 billion years ago.

This image, courtesy of Science/AAAS, is a THEMIS daytime image mosaic overlain by MOLA color-coded topography. Craters were counted for the plateau units (brown), channel units (blue-grey), and the continuous ejecta unit of Mojave crater (red line). 

Read more about this research from the 6 March issue of Science Express here.

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

Martian Meteorites from Mojave Crater

There are about 150 known Martian meteorites, and now researchers have a good idea about where many of them came from on the Red Planet. Previous studies of shergottite meteorites suggested that they might be quite young, in some cases crystallizing less than 600 million years ago. But, Werner and colleagues believe that all shergottites originate from Mars’ Mojave Crater, about 34 miles (55 kilometers) wide and placed in the crust about 4.3 billion years ago.

This image, courtesy of Science/AAAS, is a THEMIS daytime image mosaic overlain by MOLA color-coded topography. Craters were counted for the plateau units (brown), channel units (blue-grey), and the continuous ejecta unit of Mojave crater (red line).

Read more about this research from the 6 March issue of Science Express here.

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

Black Holes Give Off Stronger Winds than We Thought

Black holes release more energy into their host galaxies than previously thought, a new study suggests. This finding will help astronomers better model the evolution of black holes over time, and it will also help them better understand these mysterious regions’ effects on their host galaxies.

Read more about this research from the 27 February issue of Science Express here.

[Image courtesy of NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA). Please click here for more information.]

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

Black Holes Give Off Stronger Winds than We Thought

Black holes release more energy into their host galaxies than previously thought, a new study suggests. This finding will help astronomers better model the evolution of black holes over time, and it will also help them better understand these mysterious regions’ effects on their host galaxies.

Read more about this research from the 27 February issue of Science Express here.

[Image courtesy of NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA). Please click here for more information.]

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

Exceptionally Bright Explosion Reveals Rebel Burst Behavior

Artist’s conception of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A, one of the brightest and longest-lived GRBs observed to date. GRBs such as this one occur when the core of a massive star runs out of nuclear fuel, collapses, and forms a black hole that drives a powerful jet of plasma traveling close to the speed of light. See pages 34, 38, 42, 48, and 51.

Image: NASA/Fermi and Sonoma State University/Aurore Simonnet

Anyone wishing to use the cover of Science must contact AAAS to request permission to do so.

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

Supernovae Reveal the Origin of Elements

Researchers studying the remnants of supernovae report two exciting new discoveries: the first detection of a molecule containing a noble gas in space and the formation of phosphorus — one of the six essential elements for life as we know it — at the heart of a stellar explosion.

Read more about this research from the 13 December issue of Science here.

[Please click here for caption and credit information.]

© 2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

Supernovae Reveal the Origin of Elements

Researchers studying the remnants of supernovae report two exciting new discoveries: the first detection of a molecule containing a noble gas in space and the formation of phosphorus — one of the six essential elements for life as we know it — at the heart of a stellar explosion.

Read more about this research from the 13 December issue of Science here.

[Please click here for caption and credit information.]

© 2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

Plumes of Water at Europa’s South Pole?

A new study by Lorenz Roth and colleagues identifies what may be transient plumes of water, spouting from beneath the surface of one of Jupiter’s moons, Europa. If confirmed as plumes of water, this would show that the moon’s underground ocean has easy access to the surface — at least sometimes. (And it may also have implications for future explorations of Europa’s potential habitability.)

Read more about this research from the 12 December issue of Science Express here.

[Image courtesy of K. Retherford, Southwest Research Institute. Please click here for more information.]

© 2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

Plumes of Water at Europa’s South Pole?

A new study by Lorenz Roth and colleagues identifies what may be transient plumes of water, spouting from beneath the surface of one of Jupiter’s moons, Europa. If confirmed as plumes of water, this would show that the moon’s underground ocean has easy access to the surface — at least sometimes. (And it may also have implications for future explorations of Europa’s potential habitability.)

Read more about this research from the 12 December issue of Science Express here.

[Image courtesy of K. Retherford, Southwest Research Institute. Please click here for more information.]

© 2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

Icy Detective Discovers Extraterrestrial Particles

Sensors buried below the ice may help scientists decipher the birth place of the high-energy cosmic rays that speed through space, a new study reports. And this is exciting as the origin of these rays has long been mysterious. In this podcast, Dr. Nathan Whitehorn of the University of Wisconsin-Madison discusses the kinds of questions identification of high-energy, extraterrestrial neutrinos will help answer.

Read more about this research from the 22 November issue of Science here.

[Podcast courtesy of Science/AAAS]

© 2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

The Building Blocks of Habitable Exoplanets?

Jay Farihi and colleagues have observed a white dwarf star, known as GD 61, stripping elements from a rocky, water-rich planetary body. Before it was reduced to a dusty, circumstellar disk, this particular asteroid—or possibly, piece of an exoplanet—harbored about 26% water by mass, according to the researchers. This discovery represents the first time that a white dwarf star has been caught consuming water and rocky materials—both of which are ingredients for a habitable planet.

Read more about this research from the 11 October issue of Science here.

[Image © Mark A. Garlick, space-art.co.uk, University of Warwick and University of Cambridge. Click the image for more information.]

© 2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

Curiosity Gets to Bottom of Martian Surface

NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, at its Rocknest sample-collection site, Gale crater, Mars, on 31 October 2012. This is a mosaic of 59 images acquired by the Mars Hand Lens Imager, a camera mounted at the end of Curiosity’s robotic arm (both partly not visible during imaging and cropped out during processing). Four scoop troughs are shown; a fifth was created after the mosaic was obtained. The width of each rover wheel is 40 cm. See page 1475.

[Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Malin Space Science Systems]

Anyone wishing to use the cover of Science must contact AAAS to request permission to do so.

© 2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

Energy Conversion in the Earth’s Tail

Scientists have not understood where and how electromagnetic energy conversion occurs in the tail of magnetic particles, or the magnetotail, that trails Earth. Now, by dispatching several spacecraft to the magnetotail’s near and distant parts, V. Angelopoulos and colleagues have shed light on the matter. The team’s in situ readings of magnetic flux data suggest that magnetic energy is converted into kinetic energy in intense sheets of electrical current within reconnection fronts.

Read more about this research from the 27 September issue of Science here.

[Video courtesy of NASA/SVS. Click here for more information.]

© 2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

Arms in the Gas of the Coma Cluster

Scientists have looked deep into the core of the Coma cluster — one of the nearest and best-studied galaxy clusters — to understand more about its shape and size.

Read more about this research from the 20 September issue of Science here.

[Image courtesy of J.S. Sanders et al. / Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Click the image for more information.]

© 2013 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.