ScienceShot: X-rays Reveal New Black Hole in Andromeda

Credit: Adam Evans

On 15 January, the XMM-Newton satellite detected a bright source of x-rays in the Andromeda galaxy, 2.5 million light-years from Earth. As astronomers reported online this week in Nature, the x-rays arise from hot gas swirling around a black hole that tears the material from an orbiting star. The object is roughly 10 times as massive as our sun and gobbles matter at nearly the maximum possible rate.

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Cover image from the 8 July 2011 issue of Science.
Composite image of the Sombrero galaxy captured by the Hubble Space  Telescope in 2003. Like the Milky Way, the Sombrero                         is a spiral galaxy with a central stellar bulge  and a thin disk containing spiral arms of newly formed stars. The  special                         section beginning on page 169  examines the ways in which galaxies change over time.
Image: NASA and  The Hubble Heritage Team (Space Telescope Science Institute/Association                         of Universities for Research in Astronomy
Anyone wishing to use the cover of Science must contact AAAS to request permission to do so. 
© 2011 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

Cover image from the 8 July 2011 issue of Science.

Composite image of the Sombrero galaxy captured by the Hubble Space Telescope in 2003. Like the Milky Way, the Sombrero is a spiral galaxy with a central stellar bulge and a thin disk containing spiral arms of newly formed stars. The special section beginning on page 169 examines the ways in which galaxies change over time.

Image: NASA and The Hubble Heritage Team (Space Telescope Science Institute/Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy

Anyone wishing to use the cover of Science must contact AAAS to request permission to do so.

© 2011 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.