Keeping Track of the Globetrotters

A new study by Guy Abel and Nikola Sander suggests that, contrary to popular belief, people have not been moving between countries — that is, changing their countries of residence — at a steadily increasing rate since the early 1990’s. International migration is an important social and economic force in countries, but tracking migrants is difficult, and furthermore, countries measure migration in many different ways, making comparisons of migration flow, especially at the global level, a challenge.

The authors of this paper have developed an interactive data visualization titled “The Global Flow of People,” that illustrates their work. It is available at www.global-migration.info.

Read more about this research from the 28 March issue of Science here.

[Image by Nikola Sander and flow estimates by Guy Abel, Wittgenstein Centre & Vienna Institute of Demography, Austria. Please click here for more information.]

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

Keeping Track of the Globetrotters

A new study by Guy Abel and Nikola Sander suggests that, contrary to popular belief, people have not been moving between countries — that is, changing their countries of residence — at a steadily increasing rate since the early 1990’s. International migration is an important social and economic force in countries, but tracking migrants is difficult, and furthermore, countries measure migration in many different ways, making comparisons of migration flow, especially at the global level, a challenge.

The authors of this paper have developed an interactive data visualization titled “The Global Flow of People,” that illustrates their work. It is available at www.global-migration.info.

Read more about this research from the 28 March issue of Science here.

[Image by Nikola Sander and flow estimates by Guy Abel, Wittgenstein Centre & Vienna Institute of Demography, Austria. Please click here for more information.]

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

Underground Ocean on Enceladus Captured by Cassini

New results from the Cassini spacecraft, which has been among Saturn’s moons for the past 10 years, show that Enceladus harbors an ocean of water beneath 18 to 24 miles of ice. Based on their analysis, the researchers suggest that the south-polar region of Enceladus doesn’t have enough mass at its surface to account for the hemisphere’s gravity field, and that something dense beneath the moon’s surface — probably liquid water — must be compensating for it. They propose that a sub-surface ocean, concentrated in the moon’s southern hemisphere, extends to about 50 degrees south latitude. Their findings help to explain the mineral-rich jets of water vapor that were first observed flowing from long, distinctive fractures in the moon’s southern polar region, called tiger stripes, in 2005.

Read more about this research from the 4 April issue of Science here.

[Image courtesy of NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute. Please click here for more information.]

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

Underground Ocean on Enceladus Captured by Cassini

New results from the Cassini spacecraft, which has been among Saturn’s moons for the past 10 years, show that Enceladus harbors an ocean of water beneath 18 to 24 miles of ice. Based on their analysis, the researchers suggest that the south-polar region of Enceladus doesn’t have enough mass at its surface to account for the hemisphere’s gravity field, and that something dense beneath the moon’s surface — probably liquid water — must be compensating for it. They propose that a sub-surface ocean, concentrated in the moon’s southern hemisphere, extends to about 50 degrees south latitude. Their findings help to explain the mineral-rich jets of water vapor that were first observed flowing from long, distinctive fractures in the moon’s southern polar region, called tiger stripes, in 2005.

Read more about this research from the 4 April issue of Science here.

[Image courtesy of NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute. Please click here for more information.]

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

The Angular Control of Light

Scientists striving to control light have made progress, a new study reports. While the selection of light signals based on frequency, for example, has been well-studied, selection based on propagation direction has not. Being able to select light based on this property would help scientists better control it in myriad applications.

Read more about this research from the 28 March issue of Science here.

[Image courtesy of Weishun Xu and Yuhao Zhang. Please click here for more information.]

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

The Angular Control of Light

Scientists striving to control light have made progress, a new study reports. While the selection of light signals based on frequency, for example, has been well-studied, selection based on propagation direction has not. Being able to select light based on this property would help scientists better control it in myriad applications.

Read more about this research from the 28 March issue of Science here.

[Image courtesy of Weishun Xu and Yuhao Zhang. Please click here for more information.]

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

More Drivers than We Thought for Fly Circadian Rhythm

Flies can’t keep track of time if their many internal clocks are wildly out of synch, and, according to a new study, keeping them in synch requires more neuron networks than previously thought. 

Read more about this research from the 28 March issue of Science here.

[Image courtesy of Orie Shafer. Please click here for more information.]

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

More Drivers than We Thought for Fly Circadian Rhythm

Flies can’t keep track of time if their many internal clocks are wildly out of synch, and, according to a new study, keeping them in synch requires more neuron networks than previously thought.

Read more about this research from the 28 March issue of Science here.

[Image courtesy of Orie Shafer. Please click here for more information.]

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

Seeing the Classic Cancer Drug Paclitaxel in a New Light

A new study radically changes our understanding of how one of the most common cancer drugs works. Knowing the correct mode of action of the drug, called paclitaxel, could help improve prediction of which patients are likely to respond to it, and may also help refine the design of next-generation cancer drugs.

Read more about this research from the 26 March issue of Science Translational Medicine here.

[mage courtesy of Lauren M. Zasadil and Beth A. Weaver. Please click here for more information.]

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

Seeing the Classic Cancer Drug Paclitaxel in a New Light

A new study radically changes our understanding of how one of the most common cancer drugs works. Knowing the correct mode of action of the drug, called paclitaxel, could help improve prediction of which patients are likely to respond to it, and may also help refine the design of next-generation cancer drugs.

Read more about this research from the 26 March issue of Science Translational Medicine here.

[mage courtesy of Lauren M. Zasadil and Beth A. Weaver. Please click here for more information.]

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

“Mount Everest” of Synthetic Biology: First Eukaryotic Chromosome

For the first time, researchers have synthesized a eukaryotic chromosome, a new study reports. The chromosome was from one of the best-studied organisms on the planet, baker’s yeast, or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast is already used to make beer, biofuel and medicine, but once equipped with a full set of synthetic and changeable chromosomes like the one designed here, this single-celled organism could produce better versions of these important commodities, including new antibiotics or more environmentally friendly biofuels.

In this video courtesy of New York University Langone Medical Center, Dr. Jef Boeke discusses the research.

Read more about this research from the 28 March issue of Science here.

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

Shocking Black Hole in M83

Composite image from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope of the spiral galaxy M83 (diameter ~70% that of the Milky Way). Embedded near the center of this image is a stellar-mass black hole that bombards its surroundings with kinetic energy through hugely powerful jets. See pages 1318 and 1330.

Image: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA); W. P. Blair (STScI/JHU)

Anyone wishing to use the cover of Science must contact AAAS to request permission to do so.

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

The Proteins That Put Plants on Land?

Before Earth’s early plant life could make the transition from water to land, such botanical pioneers had to evolve specialized cells for conducting water — and a particular group of proteins, known as NAC transcription factors, likely played a significant role in that development, according to a new study. 

Read more about this research from the 21 March issue of Science Express here.

[Image courtesy of Mayuko Sato, Mayumi Wakazaki, and Kiminori Toyooka. Please click here for more information.]

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

The Proteins That Put Plants on Land?

Before Earth’s early plant life could make the transition from water to land, such botanical pioneers had to evolve specialized cells for conducting water — and a particular group of proteins, known as NAC transcription factors, likely played a significant role in that development, according to a new study.

Read more about this research from the 21 March issue of Science Express here.

[Image courtesy of Mayuko Sato, Mayumi Wakazaki, and Kiminori Toyooka. Please click here for more information.]

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

Unraveling the Antibody Mystery in HIV Vaccine Trials

An antibody of the IgG3 type, an antibody subclass known to protect against malaria and other infectious diseases, may be responsible for the variable immune response triggered by two different HIV vaccines in recent clinical trials, two new studies report. The findings could help scientists boost particular immune responses in future vaccine studies, with the aim of getting closer to an HIV vaccine that’s effective and long-lasting. 

Read more about this research from the 19 March issue of Science Translational Medicine here.

[Image courtesy of V. Altounian/Science Translational Medicine]

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

Unraveling the Antibody Mystery in HIV Vaccine Trials

An antibody of the IgG3 type, an antibody subclass known to protect against malaria and other infectious diseases, may be responsible for the variable immune response triggered by two different HIV vaccines in recent clinical trials, two new studies report. The findings could help scientists boost particular immune responses in future vaccine studies, with the aim of getting closer to an HIV vaccine that’s effective and long-lasting.

Read more about this research from the 19 March issue of Science Translational Medicine here.

[Image courtesy of V. Altounian/Science Translational Medicine]

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

Chromosomal Clues to Cancer Survival

Molecules called cytokines that function in cell signaling and are found on chromosomes could offer clues to the survival of cancer patients, a new study reports. The findings hint that therapies designed to boost or mimic IL-15 and increase the proliferation of T cells may be effective for treating cancer.

Read more about this research from the 19 March issue of Science Translational Medicine here.

[Image courtesy of Jerome Galon, INSERM, Paris, France. Please click here for more information.]

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

Chromosomal Clues to Cancer Survival

Molecules called cytokines that function in cell signaling and are found on chromosomes could offer clues to the survival of cancer patients, a new study reports. The findings hint that therapies designed to boost or mimic IL-15 and increase the proliferation of T cells may be effective for treating cancer.

Read more about this research from the 19 March issue of Science Translational Medicine here.

[Image courtesy of Jerome Galon, INSERM, Paris, France. Please click here for more information.]

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

© 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.